Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) research study - Seeking men and women between the ages of 65-75  -  Call 480-433-9735 or email wiley@saccadous.com  

Researchers from two Scottsdale based companies, SMART Brain Aging, Inc. (www.smartbrainaging.com) and Saccadous, Inc. are seeking men and women between the ages of 65-75 to participate in a Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) research study to determine the effectiveness of cognitive exercises designed to reduce or stabilize the symptoms of dementia.  Participants will also help validate and test new innovative methods of early diagnosing.

A person with MCI is at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's or another dementia.   Mild cognitive impairment causes cognitive changes that are serious enough to be noticed by the individuals experiencing them or to other people, but the changes are not severe enough to interfere with daily life or independent function. 

Research indicates that 1 in 3 men and 1 in 2 women will suffer from dementia by age 85.  Researchers, from Barrow’s Neurological Institute (Dignity Health) have discovered new methods for diagnosing and differentiating neurological disorders by measuring characteristics of involuntary eye movements, called microsaccades.  Clinicians from Smart Brain Aging have identified new cognitive exercises that have the potential to curb the effects of dementia. 

The duration of the study is one year, and a minimum of 100 subjects will be required to participate.  Individuals who elect to participate may be required to participate in one of four groups which requires weekly appointments for cognitive therapy.  The volunteer commitment will be required for approximately one year. 

Volunteers must be Phoenix or Scottsdale residents and able to travel by car to an appointment site near Old Town Scottsdale.  The study begins in January 2017 and concludes mid-2018.    

Participants have the opportunity to help advance research that is potentially disruptive and has the potential to reveal ground-breaking innovation in both the diagnosis and treatment. 

For more information about this study and to volunteer, contact us at:  wiley@saccadous.com or call 480-433-9735.

 

Principal Investigators:

Dr. John DenBoer, Clinical Neuropsychologist, SMARTaging

 

Hector Rieiro, PhD, CTO, Saccadous, Inc